Assessment Apps for Adults With Autism

The transition to adulthood is a major turning point in everybody’s life. However, for young people having autism spectrum disorder, the transition is usually very tough. Young autistic adults have lower levels of employment and even suffer from total social isolation compared to people having other disabilities.

Almost two-thirds of young adults, who have autism, have no job or gainful employment, nor any educational plans. For more than one-thirds of young adults having autism, this is often continued in their early twenties. Assessment apps for adults with autism are often used to measure their levels of competency.

But the employment scenario for young adults with autism spectrum disorder really paints a bleak picture. The economic shift in the US towards more job opportunities in the service sector hasn’t really helped much. Beginning in the mid-1970s, there has been a major shift in employment generation from the manufacturing sector to the service sector. And the type of jobs in the latter sector that requires direct customer interaction, are the jobs that most people with autism spectrum disorder find difficult to cope with. Experts recommend the capability of a young adult be first judged with assessment apps for adults with autism.

Researchers claim that by the time an individual reaches the end of high school, they face something called the “services cliff”. Autistic students in public school are eligible to get tutoring and receive mental health services, alongside other support via the special education program of their school.

But when these children graduate high school, they stop receiving the special aid services. There are some haphazard programs of various public services that are usually difficult to access. Community programs for autistic adults are usually meant for the seriously affected. High functioning adults with autism are often left out of these programs.

Federal laws for special needs children require that the high schools must help autistic students to come up with a transition plan. Unfortunately, it doesn’t happen in majority of the cases. One of the major reasons for this is that most school doesn’t have any special needs educator who’ll use assessment apps for adults with autism. Experts say that this is very important to gauge the progress of the children. For those who are not accustomed to assessment apps for adults with autism, it’s usually difficult to test an autistic individual with it. Only about 58% of the high school students in the US have a proper transition plan by the age of 14.

A Critical Review of the Young Adult’s Book – "The View From Saturday"

I was given this one by a friend of my oldest son Jordan. The book is called “The View From Saturday” by E.L. Konigsburg. I felt that this book by a very prolific author, stood out because of the simplicity of the prose and the complexity of the novel’s structure.

The emerging popularity of academic sport sets the scene in this novel about love and friendship.

In this Newbery Medal award winner, four sixth grade children, Ethan Potter, Noah Gershom, Julian Singh, and Nadia Diamondstein, create a group they call “The Souls”. The main characters in the book are sixth grade students, their teacher Eva Marie Olinski and several senior citizens. The story takes place in Epiphany Middle School in upstate New York.

The novel takes on an interesting format. It alternates between first person narrative and third person. Each member of the Souls tells their first person slice of life after answering a question during Bowl Day.

The academic bowl is coming up, and their teacher, Mrs. Olinski, chooses them to represent their school, Epiphany.

As it turns out, the Epiphany team beats even the seventh and eight graders in the Academic Bowl, and in the end, becomes the state champion.

I’m not really giving away the story here, the beauty of this book is in the writing and the portrayal of each child as well as the grownups; especially the paraplegic Mrs. Olinski.

I recommend it for 10 to 12 year olds. Those 13 and up might find it too slanted towards the younger crowd but might enjoy the story just the same.

The book is 160 pages, which makes it a short read for most junior high / middle school children. I would recommend it for boys and girls. The style is varied and the characters are solid and grounded though most are given to flights of fancy.

A Handful Of Good Books For Young Adults

There are tons of good books for young adults to be found. It is true that not many reach the superstar success of Harry Potter or Twilight, but the young adult genre is competitive and ever-growing, and there are many best-selling novels that you may not hear about. The authors and books suggested in this article are just a few of very many. Each is unique, original, entertaining and well-written, and has a big (and growing) fan-base.

The Artemis Fowl series by Eoin Colfer defies genre, and is smart, funny and slick besides. A child genius and criminal prodigy, young Artemis Fowl is the heir to the Fowl criminal empire. A dab hand at devious plots and a connoisseur of electronics and cutting edge tech, Artemis discovers the existence of fairies and hatches a plot to ransom one for the legendary pot of gold. Things get hairy when the victim turns out to be LEP Recon Officer Holly Short – a pixie that just happens to be an elite law enforcement agent.

Colfer has grabbed the imagination of millions with this superb blend of slick action, gadgets to make even Q green with envy, well-conceived and -developed characters, classic fantasy elements and witty, smart narrative. The novels have been made into graphic novels and there is a film in development.

Inkheart, Inkspell and Inkdeath – The three books in the Inkworld series by Cornelia Funke – are captivating. Maggie and her father Mo, a book-binder, have always shared a love of reading, but her experience of adventure is limited to the page. When weird – and sometimes too-familiar – characters start popping into their lives, Mo packs Maggie into their car and they skip town, and Maggie starts to suspect that her ‘average’ dad is anything but. She is correct – Mo is a Silvertongue, possessed of the magical ability to read things out of their stories and into the ‘real’ world. Trouble is, he has no control over what comes out, and for everything that comes out, something from the real world has to go in.

Pursued by a motley crew of villains trying to destroy ‘Inkheart’ – The book they escaped and the same book that Mo’s wife disappeared into years ago. Brendan Fraser plays Mo in the recent hit movie adaptation of Inkheart.

Any list of good reads for young adults (however brief) cannot omit the genius of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld books or the dark mastery of Neil Gaiman. Read anything written by either master for a fantastic experience – if you are undecided, opt for the superb novel Good Omens, which they wrote together. Movie-fans will recognize Gaiman’s name from the movies Coraline and Stardust – both adapted from his novels. Terry Pratchett’s name should also ring a bell – the Discworld has inspired films, TV-shows, comics and video games.

The task of writing a complete list of ‘good books for young adults’ is herculean – there are too many to choose from. The best way to find books, though, is to read books – go to the library, your preferred bookstore or website, and start turning pages: the perfect fantastic world is out there waiting for you to jump in.