Assessment Apps for Adults With Autism

The transition to adulthood is a major turning point in everybody’s life. However, for young people having autism spectrum disorder, the transition is usually very tough. Young autistic adults have lower levels of employment and even suffer from total social isolation compared to people having other disabilities.

Almost two-thirds of young adults, who have autism, have no job or gainful employment, nor any educational plans. For more than one-thirds of young adults having autism, this is often continued in their early twenties. Assessment apps for adults with autism are often used to measure their levels of competency.

But the employment scenario for young adults with autism spectrum disorder really paints a bleak picture. The economic shift in the US towards more job opportunities in the service sector hasn’t really helped much. Beginning in the mid-1970s, there has been a major shift in employment generation from the manufacturing sector to the service sector. And the type of jobs in the latter sector that requires direct customer interaction, are the jobs that most people with autism spectrum disorder find difficult to cope with. Experts recommend the capability of a young adult be first judged with assessment apps for adults with autism.

Researchers claim that by the time an individual reaches the end of high school, they face something called the “services cliff”. Autistic students in public school are eligible to get tutoring and receive mental health services, alongside other support via the special education program of their school.

But when these children graduate high school, they stop receiving the special aid services. There are some haphazard programs of various public services that are usually difficult to access. Community programs for autistic adults are usually meant for the seriously affected. High functioning adults with autism are often left out of these programs.

Federal laws for special needs children require that the high schools must help autistic students to come up with a transition plan. Unfortunately, it doesn’t happen in majority of the cases. One of the major reasons for this is that most school doesn’t have any special needs educator who’ll use assessment apps for adults with autism. Experts say that this is very important to gauge the progress of the children. For those who are not accustomed to assessment apps for adults with autism, it’s usually difficult to test an autistic individual with it. Only about 58% of the high school students in the US have a proper transition plan by the age of 14.

A Critical Review of the Young Adult’s Book – "The View From Saturday"

I was given this one by a friend of my oldest son Jordan. The book is called “The View From Saturday” by E.L. Konigsburg. I felt that this book by a very prolific author, stood out because of the simplicity of the prose and the complexity of the novel’s structure.

The emerging popularity of academic sport sets the scene in this novel about love and friendship.

In this Newbery Medal award winner, four sixth grade children, Ethan Potter, Noah Gershom, Julian Singh, and Nadia Diamondstein, create a group they call “The Souls”. The main characters in the book are sixth grade students, their teacher Eva Marie Olinski and several senior citizens. The story takes place in Epiphany Middle School in upstate New York.

The novel takes on an interesting format. It alternates between first person narrative and third person. Each member of the Souls tells their first person slice of life after answering a question during Bowl Day.

The academic bowl is coming up, and their teacher, Mrs. Olinski, chooses them to represent their school, Epiphany.

As it turns out, the Epiphany team beats even the seventh and eight graders in the Academic Bowl, and in the end, becomes the state champion.

I’m not really giving away the story here, the beauty of this book is in the writing and the portrayal of each child as well as the grownups; especially the paraplegic Mrs. Olinski.

I recommend it for 10 to 12 year olds. Those 13 and up might find it too slanted towards the younger crowd but might enjoy the story just the same.

The book is 160 pages, which makes it a short read for most junior high / middle school children. I would recommend it for boys and girls. The style is varied and the characters are solid and grounded though most are given to flights of fancy.

Three Young Adult Literary Heroines Named After Flowers

The kinship between flowers and women goes beyond the concept of beauty and romance. Flowers have a significant role in giving women their voice when society tried to silence them. Dawning in the 17th century, women used a secret language of flowers to express themselves when they were buried under the power of patriarchy.

Bookworms will agree that the fruits of women revolutions are vindicated in creating powerful women literary characters christened with meaningful flower names. Young girls (like myself a few years back) learn so much from the lives of the today’s celebrated fictional characters. Here are three young girls who proved that women are epic!

Katniss Everdeen (Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins)

Set in a post-apocalyptic and dystopian society, a powerful young girl emerged as the hero that her family and country needs. Katniss Everdeen is named after the katniss plant/ flower. This name takes a significant role in her destiny as a fighter.

She lives up to her name by becoming a symbol for change in the cruel world– ending hunger and poverty. It is no wonder Mama and Papa Everdeen named her Katniss as the bloom’s roots, tasting like potatoes, is a staple food for native Americans.

The Hunger Games is a play of life and death. Each tribute never hesitates to kill for the glory of coming out as the champion. Different district tributes have distinct skills. Our girl from District 12, Katniss, is the best archer. Surprisingly, the katniss plant has a latin name Sagittaria, after the zodiac archer, Sagittarius. Slay!

Lily Evans-Potter (Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling)

Harry Potter’s first conversation with Professor Snape is immortalized with the Professor’s question “What would I get if I added powdered root of asphodel to an infusion of wormwood?” In the language of flowers, Asphodel is a lily that signifying remembrance in death or after the tomb. Potterheads know very well that Lily is the Snape’s forever love, even after her death. Always, right?

Lilies symbolize not only purity, but as well as nurturing, motherhood and lasting relationships. Like her namesake, she nurtured and connected with Harry even when she is beyond the veil. Lily is more than just being loved by a man. She is also a brave and loving mother to her child Harry. She died for him and continued to look after him.

Viola (Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare)

William Shakespeare yet again created a fantastic character in the persona of Viola. A daring woman who dressed like her twin brother to work in the court of Duke. As a survivor that she is, Viola upholds the essence of the viola flower. This blossom represents simplicity, but also vibrancy. In the midst of adversity, Viola strives to become the best woman she can be.

It is a great time to be a woman!